Japanese Knotweed

Japanese Knotweed (Fallopia japonica) is an ornamental plant that was introduced in the United Kingdom back in the 19th Century. It is a beautiful herbaceous perennial plant that originally came from the Eastern part of Asia, and is found primarily within Japan, China, and Korea.

The plant has white to golden, fleece-like clusters of flowers and broad leaves. It is sometimes mistaken for bamboo because of its distinctive hollow stems. Japanese Knotweed grows to about 3-4 metres during the summer, and reaches its maximum adult height at around autumn. The flowers also appear in the late summer to early autumn, and form erect racemes.

Japanese Knotweed is an invasive species in the United Kingdom and throughout the rest of Europe. The plant grows quickly and is one of the most successful survivors in the area, competing with other local flora and eradicating them. In fact, Japanese Knotweed has been touted as one of the top 100 Worst Invasive Species in the world according to the World Conservation Union.

The plant is extremely hardy and tends to grow repeatedly even if cut down. It multiplies quickly because new plants would grow around the larger plants, and cutting it down only allows it to thrive even further. It is a rhizome, and therefore has a very large, extensive network of roots. The plant cannot be killed unless the roots are completely destroyed, and this is best done by a professional Knotweed eradication unit.

Japanese Knotweed surveys can be utilised to assess the extent of the knotweed invasion. Japanese knotweed removal is a difficult process, and it sometimes takes years to completely destroy the plant.

Most Japanese knotweed eradication units use a combination of controlled cutting of the main plant coupled with a strong herbicide to kill the roots. The herbicide should be strong enough to penetrate the soil deeply, attacking the plants at the very roots. You could certainly try and remove it yourself and try a company like AMB Environmental to take it away for you. They specialise more in tank cleaning but they also do waste removal so could certainly take the weeds away too.

Japanese Knotweed

A faster way to get rid of Japanese Knotweed is to dig up the soil completely, taking all of the roots along with it. This is Japanese knotweed eradication is important because an invasive species like this one can really upset the delicate equilibrium of the local ecosystems. They compete with other plants for space, and is capable of killing entire groups of local flora. This is bad news for other organisms that rely on the native vegetation to survive.particularly useful for areas that will be developed and dug up anyway. However, soil disposal poses a problem, and soil that contains Japanese knotweed roots is considered a controlled waste in the UK, because it still has to be treated with herbicides to make sure that the plant does not sprout up in the area where the soil was dumped.

To be able to preserve European vegetation and to prevent this invasive species from overtaking entire acres of land, Japanese Knotweed eradication is essential. If you see Japanese Knotweed in your home, it is important that you call a professional who will eradicate and dispose of the plant using the correct eradication procedures.

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